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Some of the Oldest War Vehicles Still in Use Today

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Some of the Oldest War Vehicles Still in Use Today
Source: Pinterest

Some of the Oldest War Vehicles Still in Use Today

Source: Pinterest

Military spending takes a large percentage of the annual budget in many countries, and it is essential to advance wartime technology. 
However, some countries can’t afford to spend so much on military technology. Sometimes, this means they must use relatively antiquated vehicles, some dating back to the Cold War and World War II.
Below are some of the oldest war vehicles that are still in pristine condition even today. 

Sikorsky Black Hawk

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The Black Hawk is a multipurpose helicopter that has been in service since 1979. It is a medium-lift helicopter manned by four, typically a pilot, co-pilot, and crew chief.
It can carry 11 troops or six stretcher patients plus medical attendants and has a top speed of 222 mph, making it one of the world’s fastest helicopters. 

Type 209

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This diesel-electric attack submarine was created exclusively for sale to other countries. 
Specifications vary due to the adaptable nature of the Type 209, but it requires about 40 people to pilot and has a submerged displacement of 1,200 tons. It can dive as deep as 500 meters and has a range of about 430 miles when submerged.

Victor Class

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The Victor Class is a submarine still operational in Russia, where it was initially commissioned in 1967. It is one of the earliest nuclear-powered attack submarines, the Soviets’ answer to the U.S. Sturgeon Class sub. It can be recognized by its teardrop-shaped hull and the large sonar pod on its stern plane.

Boeing CH-47 Chinook

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It is one of the most popular helicopters in history. It has dual rotors and a bulbous profile but also boasts versatility as a medium to heavy-lift vehicle.
Consistent updates have ensured that the design will remain functional until 2060, and the latest update boasts advanced features, including a digital cockpit management system, autopilot functionality, a digital flight control system with hover and landing assists, and advanced cargo capabilities. 

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

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It is a tried-and-true design that hasn’t required replacing since it entered military service in 1956. The C-130 Hercules can transport large payloads from runways high in altitude and poorly surfaced.  
It has four Rolls-Royce turboprop engines and will fly at a top speed of 417 miles per hour at an altitude of 22,000 feet.

Tupolev TU-95

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Many call the bomber a carbon copy prototype of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress. The Tupolev TU-95, which entered service in 1956, was Russia’s reply to the B-52. It is capable of carrying a nuclear payload. They were briefly grounded in 2015 after two accidents.

Boeing B-52 Stratofortress

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The B-52 is unique and has impressive specifications. It is so large that it requires a fantastic set of skills and specially designed landing gear to attempt a takeoff and landing.
It has eight Pratt and Whitney turbofan engines, a 185-foot wingspan, a maximum speed of 650 miles per hour, and a range of 8,800 miles. The B-52 is expected to remain in service until well after 2040.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17

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The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 has served in more than 20 military forces since it was first produced in 1951.
It is an update of the MiG-15 and is more agile, with an extended fuselage and more acutely angled wings. It boasts three cannons and 16 rockets and can reach up to 711 miles per hour.

M47 Patton

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The M47 Patton unit started service in 1950. Its name is a nod to the legendary General George S. Patton, who died five years before the commissioning. The unit boasts four-inch armor plating and a twin-turbo V12 engine that produces 810 horsepower.
For arms, it has a 90-millimeter cannon and dual 30 and 50-caliber machine guns with anti-aircraft capabilities. A modernized version of it is currently operational with the Iranian army.

T-54/T-55

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The T-54 prototype was created in 1946, immediately after the Second World War, and entered production in 1947. This tank and its sibling, the modified T-55, are some of the most famous tanks in history. 
The T-54 has a 100-millimeter main cannon, a 7.62-millimeter turret-mounted machine gun, and a 520-horsepower V12 engine. 

M3 Stuart

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Many admire this machine for its reliability, speed, and robust build. It boasts about 1 1/2 inches thick armor, up to four machine guns, and the primary 37-millimeter anti-tank rifle.
It has been in service since 1941 and is still operational as a training vehicle with the Paraguay military. 

T-34

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The T-34 was developed in the late 1930s. It combined mobility with a rugged build and firepower.
Its original features included a powerful 7.62-millimeter main gun, wide tracks, and sloped armor that effectively deflected enemy shells. The T-34 remains a valuable asset to the armies of North Korea, Laos, Vietnam, Yemen, and Guinea, to name a few.